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How Google Analytics Gets Information

When Google Analytics code gathers information about each pageview, how does it send that information to the data collection servers so it can be processed?

The information is sent in the query string of a request for the __utm.gif file. This file is requested for every single pageview, transaction and event. When the files are processed, Google Analytics can then string together the individual actions into a visit.

Customize Code and Automatically Tag Outbound Links

Today we announce the roll out of two free Google Analytics tools: a tracking code generator and LinkTagger. These allow for easy customization of your Google Analytics tracking code and for automatic tagging of all your outbound links and downloads.

Google Analytics and Web Server Log Files

People frequently use Google Analytics in tandem with another tool (like Angelfish Software) to audit data or verify accuracy. But when you compare data between Google Analytics and another web analytics program, the numbers will always be different.

This article will explain the reasons for data differences between Google Analytics and server-based web log analysis tools.

Creating Goals in Google Analytics

Google Analytics becomes much more useful when it looks for activities that are important to you.

Goals in Google Analytics allow you to define important events and track conversions. You can tie those events back to websites or marketing initiatives that brought visitors to your site. You can also use them to measure the relative influence of each page on your site.

Google Analytics is Slow

Despite its strengths, Google Analytics can sometimes be slow. It's not uncommon to hear users complain that Google Analytics is loading more slowly than they would like. These complaints fall under two categories: the interface itself is not responding quickly, or the data is not updating fast enough.

Troubleshooting Google Analytics

If things don't seem quite right, these articles can show you where to look for answers. There are red flags to watch for in your reports that signal that your implementation is wrong or perhaps that somebody is using your code on their site. If something goes wrong on Google's end, these articles show you how to avoid disruptions and negative visitor experiences. These also answer common questions and concerns about Google Analytics and the impact of having it on your website.

Extending Google Analytics

Go beyond logging into your Google Analytics to review saved reports. Move to the next level of web analytics. Export data. Mash it up with other metrics. Look at the horizon of the industry and find the next mountain to climb.

These articles focus on ways to extend Google Analytics' basic functionality and on where the web analytics industry is moving.